Innovation of Business

and the
Business of Innovation™
 
Client Stories - B-C

British Petroleum’s Shared Petrotechnical   Resource (SPR)

Delivered technical services and technology development from early exploration through drilling and production to pipelines and transport facilities.

Challenges

Image: Two objectives had been established prior to Lundquist’s involvement. Ensure that:
  >> 1. SPR people and teams know and can speak powerfully about the value of what they do.
  >> 2. The Assets (BP business units worldwide) know and believe in the value of SPR to their own E&P efforts.
  Organization: Downsizing over the years had shocked the culture, leading to lack of trust and little teaming. SPR needed to build a culture better able to keep people and improve service value.
  Type of work: Move from being a manpower resource to being a strategic partner. Contribute early in projects while key strategic decisions Were being made.
  Competition: Prove its worth to company and Assets relative to outsource vendors. Vendors marketed aggressively to BP.
  Asset Champions: Define the role and strategies of Asset Champions as liaison between SPR and the Assets.

Solutions

Team: We joined the Asset Champion for SPR to the Gulf of Mexico Asset (GoM) and a small team. 
Preliminary Vision: We led the team through Strategic Identity analysis of SPR, developing a strategic view of SPR and finding a suite of mindset problems that slowed progress.
Champion Strategies: We defined an actions role model for Asset Champions by setting goals, choosing objectives, and selecting strategies.
Situation Analysis: Asset input and Champion strategies clearly indicated needs for SPR to better understand their customers, businesses, context, problems, and constraints. We performed  paired executive-interview market-research projects in both the GoM Asset and the SPR unit in Houston.   Both Asset staff and SPR wanted a strategic  SPR involved in early analysis of E&P decisions, using expertise the Assets could not maintain. 
Internal Marketing: Situation Analysis results were boiled down to a few slides presented to Asset Regional  Technology leaders who expressed broad agreement and enthusiasm.
 The SPR Source: We designed a Website to connect customers to SPR by stating a problem, then finding   expertise. Within SPR, the site would be used as a resourcing tool to find the right expertise to meet an Asset opportunity.
  Vision: We developed a vision – “A Strategic Petrotechnical Resource”.   Because I’d done the analyses, I had a clearer vision of the potential SPR than anyone inside SPR. We identified a new line of distinctly strategic services and repackaged previously tactical services into “custom engineered services”. I established a natural opportunity generation (marketing) process   based on listening and relationship development. We then used situation analysis results to clarify current and desired cultural norms and defined a process for instilling new norms.

Results

I met with the Global Director of SPR and we outlined a rollout of the Houston work to SPR worldwide. He loved the vision and saw strong benefits to both BP and SPR. My work would make a difference.
A few months later, BP merged with Amoco, creating radical reorganization, yet the vision document was still incorporated in planning.

Bureau of Mines

The Bureau developed technologies and processes to reduce the number of deaths in mines, and was dramatically successful. Prior to shutdown, the Bureau invested in transfer of technologies to preserve the value of research already done.

Challenges

Market assessment: Determine whether sufficient market opportunities existed to   justify technology transfer.
Technology transfer: Find and ttract licensees for Bureau technologies at much higher success rates than normal. 
Agents of change: Develop marketing skills in technical professionals with no marketing orientation. Project managers Were killing otherwise good opportunities with poor communications.
 New focus: Develop a solutions focus instead of a technology focus. Technology teams throughout the Bureau Were developing technologies with virtually no consideration for deployment. 
Homework: Enable effective technology marketing by developing key results including: Brand names, value propositions, uniqueness proofs, benefits   lists, and more.

Solutions

Concept Analysis: To manage assessment costs, we leveraged the most cost   effective methods first. The technical teams were world-class experts in   their domains and kept abreast of developments by other researchers.
I developed new a brainstorming   process, Concept Analysis, to tap the knowledge of technical professionals. We worked on four levels of concept: technical, application, markets, and completed products. The process also gathered team knowledge on potential adopters. Resulting reports established foundations for further market   assessment.
Executive interviews: We spoke with a variety of experts, using a prepared list of questions. 
>> We worked out from original contacts to others that had been   recommended. The final assessment report synthesized responses into answers   to the target questions of assessment.
Training: Assessment work clarified Bureau Weaknesses in marketing. We taught “Bridging the Gaps”, a course designed to introduce core marketing and tech-transfer concepts to technical professionals. 
Technology Marketing: For each technology, we developed strategic identities as though the technology were a commercially ready product. Visioning addressed focus, value, and image. We then designed and produced cover letters, brochures, and presentations.
 >> In one case, we developed a marketing strategy and plan to guide   licensing efforts that served as a template for other licensing efforts. In   another case, the logical licensee participated in brainstorming, both learning and sharing information.
GeoGuard®: The story of this technology was developed as a chapter in Marketing for Survival and Technology and the Agents of Change. Available on request.

Results

Licensed technologies: Three of five technologies We worked on Were preserved. Two were licensed; one was taken over by NASA. One was too early for licensing, and one suffered from an unsolved technical problem. 
Culture change: Bureau personnel who participated in any of these efforts learned that adopters license value, not technologies. Indeed, licensing successes were due to adopter perceptions f market value, not to technical excellence.
  Preservation of research: Results of programs paid for by tax dollars were saved, creating jobs and returning value to the American economy.

Chevron Research and Technology

Delivered refining technologies through a Technology Marketing group attached to Chevron International Oil Company.

Challenges

Product   launches: Generate return on investment in several new technologies nearing commercial readiness. 
Competing: Make sales in spite of a formidable new competitor created by a merger.
Marketing performance: Match the marketing performance of the competitor   who had large staff and high-quality collaterals.
Technology to product: Help R&D productize their results. Help marketing translate specs into customer language. 
Commodities: Sustain sales of commodity products at high prices through improved marketing and branding.

Solutions

Product   identities: We led five teams through product-marketing analyses to define product brands and marketing messages. 
Bridging the gap: Analysis brought marketing/sales together with technologists, where each gained appreciation of the other.
Brochures: We wrote text, got approval from technology, then worked with a design specialist and monitored production.
Presentations: We developed sales briefings on each product and trained sales staff.
White papers: With no prior experience in refining, we co-authored light technical papers.

Results

Three products were successfully launched, and two re-launched. Sales completed during my time gained revenues of tens of millions per unit.
 >> Market Engineering’s process strengthened relationships between the technical world of R&D and the commercial world of marketing and sales. Each learned about the other while working to convert lab technologies into world-class   commercial products.

CollabraTec

An early entrepreneurial company focused on business services for introduction of virtual collaboration as a corporate strategy. Helped other companies become more virtual in terms of systems, processes, and people.

Challenges

Business   formation: Build a corporate vision and plan. See itself through its client’s eyes.
Services development: Set criteria for service success, then develop and test processes.
Image: Accelerate market visibility and credibility.
Sales: Build relationships, learn client needs, generate revenues.
Alliances: Speed growth through partners and associates.

Solutions

Corporate   vision: We defined the business with a combination of Strategic Identity, goals and objectives, business strategies, culture – both a stable guideline for   development and a flexible platform for growth.
Market research: Interviews that targeted client segments and needs. Database research for market size and   direction.
Product vision: We built a detailed vision of services, then managed development. An early client gave much needed experience.
Branding: Strategic and product marketing defined brand elements then built them into website, brochure, and sales materials.
Sales: A consultative sales method discovered perfectly fitting, customized client services.

Results

CollabraTec was incorporated a month after analysis began. Powerful strategic marketing enabled immediate launch and direct contact with potential clients. Within two months of beginning analyses, the focus had shifted almost entirely to sales and service. 
The company landed PricewaterhouseCoopers as its first client and used the experience both forcredibility and continued growth of the services suite.

Colorado Innovation Summit

The Colorado Innovation Summit was an annual conference designed to accelerate both innovation and wealth creation for teams and their companies. Summits were staged in 2003 and 2004 by Market Engineering in cooperation with the DaVinci Institute.

Challenges

Both Market Engineering and DaVinci had experience in developing and producing conferences. Our first decision was to focus on “innovation” which had become the buzzword of the day. In part, we needed clarity on what innovation was. That is, we needed a credible language of innovation. Second, we needed to  found a business with all the attending complexities. With legal agreements on division of responsibilities and rewards, we began development.

Solutions

We developed a Strategic Identity and an Integrated Strategy. Our plans for all conferences in the future included: Identity, 6 long-term goals, 37 plan-year objectives, 6 categories of strategies, 35 distinct strategies, and 200+ tactics in project management. Once past design, the focus had shifted almost entirely to sales and service.  

Results

Unfortunately, growth was not sufficient for sponsors to justify investment in the next year’s Summit. This business  unit is closed pending abilities of other Market Engineering business units to fund further conferences.

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