Innovation of Business

and the
Business of Innovation™
 
Client Stories P-R

Paragon

Real-Time   Collaboration Software

No Story

Paradigm Geophysical

This company spun out of its parent with leading-edge software technology. Though they had a cadre of software developers in Israel, this company was, effectively, just two people when we developed the corporate Strategic Identity.

Challenges

Launch   a company: Make the strategic marketing decisions required to design, develop and launch a new company. 
Launch a product: Make core decisions to focus product development and marketing.
Time to launch: Work from strategy through tactics in time for a major trade show.
Build an image: Define brands at corporate and product levels, and build market recognition. 
Product focus: Focus product development on a broad user base, not the technical elite.
Take and hold a niche: Be the first into a software segment, then dominate that niche.

Solutions

Company   identity: Within weeks of spin-off, we had developed a Strategic Identity and built it into brochures. The slogan, “Think in depth!” led a core industry trend by years. 
Niche focus: Paradigm had software to outgrow its niche immediately. We convinced  them to remain focused on their strengths and avoid direct competition. 
Product identity: Marketing  analysis defined the flagship product and developed rev 1 features and growth path. We created persuasive brochures.
 Design-control customer: We focused them on the volume customer, opening a larger market with immediate revenues. 
Alliances: Other companies needed  Paradigm’s work to flesh out their product lines. Paradigm chose independence  to ensure control of their niche.

Results

Paradigm chose, occupied, and dominated a new software niche. It successfully launched its flagship system,  then expanded its product line within that niche. In six years, Paradigm grew from start-up to $50 million/y, a true   success story.

         

 Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC)

During the first quarter of 1998, the PTTC initiated a brainstorming analysis of how to improve its marketing image. The results of the process were needed to start building  revenue streams from products and services, and obtain funding to leverage the ongoing support of the U.S. Department of Energy.  

Challenges

PTTC was a new organization developed as a resource for informing U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers of new technologies that would improve cost effectiveness of drilling and producing.    

Solutions

PTTC helped producers make these decisions with a three-part resource. (1) PTTC matured by developing a Strategic Identity. The team had a much better sense of the impact this new organization could create. (2) As a new organization, marketing was essential. The team developed language for marketing PTTC services to the independent oil/gas producers. (3) The team developed long turn goals, creating a path into the future. The path, then, created credibility among the producers.    

Results

A problem was that the council  had one representative per state and very little money assigned to PTTC.  Indeed, when the foundations had been set, Market Engineering services were ended. In the long run, the Colorado School of Mines became host to PTTC, and it is still active.

   

 

PowerProbe Geophysical

This start-up was founded to commercialize an oil detection technology licensed from Russia.

Challenges

Funding: The venture capitalist needed to confidence in both the market and the abilities of the company to generate ROI.
Identity: The company did not know itself or its potential. It was named WeGA-D, an acronym made of Russian words for the technology.
Overcome market skepticism: A bad history of electrical tools in the oil industry meant that any new electrical method was automatically seen as a   sham. No such system would be accepted without extensive testing. Also, the   oil industry was focused on seismic to the point that other methods received   little attention. 
Early adopters: The new company  needed a few clients to let them field test the WeGA-D system on prospects with seismic data.
 Niche definition: The company competed both with seismic methods and the ghost of electrical methods. The right choice of niche could take them out of direct competition, establishing a market in which they were the only competitors.
Launch: The company had begun to market itself, yet had not executed a formal launch. Service development was still in progress. While field processes were being formalized, customer deliverables needed to evolve to match target customer needs. 
Marketing: Management were family   members with great integrity and determination, but little business acumen. They  had differentiated their services by marketing against other methods. The company needed practical experience in business and marketing.
Sales: Natural talent needed the support of a strong brand, integrated marketing strategies, and persuasive   messages.

Solutions

Market research: We surveyed local markets with executive-interviews. We discovered a strong need for non-seismic information to prioritize drilling options.
Corporate identity: We led the senior management team through strategic marketing analysis to develop a rich corporate vision including name, vision, mission, position, products, goals, objectives, strategies, and differentiation. 
Product identity: Product-marketing analysis clarified functions, customers, needs, benefits, value, and position. 
Competition: We chose a niche, “Hydrocarbon Diagnosis” that dramatically simplified competition and distinguished this service from the ghosts of other electrical systems. This single decision put PowerProbe into a distinct class, a logical add-on to current exploration methods.
Brand: We integrated name, niche, slogan, and core value proposition into the basis for a powerful, persuasive brand.
Launch: We established a suite of marketing strategies to be used together in a formal business launch,   including custom presentations, direct mail, PR, advertising, and sales. We developed the brochures and other literature needed to support the   strategies.

Results

Market research led to the company getting its venture capital, with part of those dollars earmarked for Market Engineering services.
PowerProbe grew as an unique service in the oil industry providing new information not available from seismic. It grew out of the shadow of electrical methods and into its own stature as a proven provider.  PowerProbe Went on to become profitable and was sold to a seismic contractor who saw Hydrocarbon Diagnosis as a competitive advantage in the overcrowded seismic industry.

Product Development and Management   Association
  Rocky Mountains Chapter - RMpdma

A professional association devoted to product innovation developed by a small community of individuals focused on innovation and frustrated by lack of an association that met our needs.

Challenges

Group   cohesion: Ideas were abundant, yet we had no structure for integrating them.
Competing: Denver had well over 100 other associations. We needed an identity.
Membership: We needed clarity on whom we would serve.
Service: We needed to identify the value of belonging to both local chapter and national.
Organization: Naming officer positions was easy. Deciding responsibilities was more complex.
Re-invention: In 2006 a calamity of officer resignations left just Lundquist to keep events going, find a new   board, and re-launch the Chapter.

Solutions

Facilitated   brainstorming: The founding group grew into an effective advisory board by working together on startup issues.
Strategic Identity: We developed a focus, clear statements of value offered, and positioning/branding.
Recruiting: Done primarily by word of mouth, yet leveraging language from the identity.
Strategy: We set objectives, then allocated responsibilities to each officer position. That is, officers became strategies for achieving desired results.
Re-launch: At the end of 2006, identity and strategy were completely redone. Comparison between 2000 and 2006 pre-planning were significant. In part, board members included representatives of large companies. In part, the pre-planning processes had matured.

Results

Stability: Illness and other issues have resulted in high officer turnover, yet the quality of members and attendees have filled gaps and sustained growth.
Certifications: PDMA offered   certification as New Product Development Professional. With one large company leading, Rocky Mountains Chapter (as of 2008) develops more NPDPs that any other chapter worldwide.
Survival: Where many associations face dire consequences of a failing national economy, RMpdma thrives, in large part because of local branding of the NPDP certification.
Thriving: RMpdma is able to test new ideas, work with other associations, attract insightful speakers, and vary meeting formats to serve a wider range of innovators.

Reed Crowther

Reid Crowther and Partners, Ltd., had developed a software product of simulating the behavior and performance of secondary clarifiers, the component of sewage treatment plants that perform solid-liquid separation. Having proved the process in one Calgary plant, the company wanted to offer the software worldwide.

Challenges

This well known construction company had never taken a software product to market. They had no infrastructure or expertise in packaging and launching software systems.

Solutions

We developed marketing strategies for a new-to-the-world product. They offered two versions of Clarity: a system for existing clarifiers, and a system to be integrated into new treatment plants. We defined the value of Clarity, and used that in direct mail marketing. Logical, since plants are known and accessible by mail.

Results

Market Engineering was being engaged by Texaco, and could not work further for this client.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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